News

Unlocking the secrets of the universe’s brightest galaxies

27 September 2015 Astronomy Now

Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are the brightest galaxies in the universe, yet invisible to the naked eye. But look through an infrared telescope, and they light up the sky. They are probably 12 or 13 billion years old, and what makes them so luminous is that they form stars very quickly — 1000 times faster than our Milky Way.

News

Unlocking the secrets of the universe’s brightest galaxies

23 September 2015 Astronomy Now

The brightest galaxies in the universe, known as submillimetre galaxies (SMGs), aren’t visible to the naked eye. But look through an infrared telescope, and they light up the sky. They are probably 12 or 13 billion years old, and what makes them so luminous is that they form stars very quickly — 1000 times faster than our Milky Way. Now researchers have the first viable model of the origins of SMGs.

News

Gravitationally-lensed distant galaxies imaged with the Large Millimetre Telescope

31 August 2015 Astronomy Now

The Large Millimetre Telescope (LMT) is the world’s largest single-dish, steerable, millimetre-wavelength telescope designed specifically for astronomical observations. Astronomers have used the newly-operational LMT, situated on the summit of Volcán Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4,600 metres, in a set of early science spectroscopic studies of submillimetre galaxies.