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“Comet C/2013 A1 alongside Mars” by Sebastian Voltmer

6 October 2015 Astronomy Now

This image is the last winner we have from the eleven categories in the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition 2015 — that of using a robotic telescope. It shows the power of remote imaging, since Sebastian Voltmer in Germany used the iTelescope at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia to capture Comet C/2013 A1 passing very close to Mars on 19 October 2014.

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“Silk Skies” by Jamen Percy

5 October 2015 Astronomy Now

Jamen Percy’s ethereal view of an auroral display over Abisko National Park, Lapland, Sweden was captured with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III camera, 24mm f/1.4 lens and a 4-second, ISO 2000 exposure — winning image of the Aurorae category in the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition 2015.

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“A Celestial Visitor” by George Martin

1 October 2015 Astronomy Now

This picture of Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy was taken from Market Harborough, Leicestershire by 15-year-old George Martin on 18 December 2014 using his new 8-inch f/5 Newtonian telescope and a Nikon D3200 camera — winning image of the Young Competition category in the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition 2015.

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“Huge Prominence Lift-off” by Paolo Porcellana

29 September 2015 Astronomy Now

This spectacular six-panel mosaic picture of a solar prominence was taken in Italy by astrophotographer Paolo  Porcellana on 27 March 2015 using a home-made 150mm f/15 refractor — winning image of the Our Sun category in the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition 2015.

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“Full Face of our Moon” by András Papp

26 September 2015 Astronomy Now

To preserve the sense of the Moon caught at exactly at half phase, Hungarian astrophotographer András Papp carefully balanced multiple images of the darkened hemisphere, terminator and illuminated face of the Moon, all recorded on the same night — winning image of the Our Moon category in the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition 2015.

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“M33 Core” by Michael van Doorn

25 September 2015 Astronomy Now

This glorious image of the core of Local Group galaxy Messier 33 (NGC 598) in the constellation Triangulum was captured from Almere, Flevoland, Netherlands by astrophotographer Michael van Doorn — winning image of the Galaxies category in the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition 2015.

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“Sunset Peak Star Trail” by Chap Him Wong

23 September 2015 Astronomy Now

This image was captured from Sunset Peak, Lantau Island, Hong Kong by astrophotographer Chap Him Wong. Above the peak covered with gold and silver grass, the tantalising sky reveals star trails and the Milky Way beyond — winning image of the People & Space category in the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition 2015.

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“The Magnificent Omega Centauri” by Ignacio Diaz Bobillo

23 September 2015 Astronomy Now

Omega (ω) Centauri, or NGC 5139, is the brightest and largest globular cluster. This showpiece object of the southern sky is captured here in all its glory by astrophotographer Ignacio Diaz Bobillo — winning image of the Stars & Nebulae category in the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition 2015.

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Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2015 overall winner: Luc Jamet

18 September 2015 Astronomy Now

“Eclipse Totality over Sassendalen” is the overall winning picture, making Luc Jamet of France the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2015. The prestigious annual competition received 2700 spectacular entries from 59 countries this year. The winning images from the 11 categories are showcased at the Royal Observatory Greenwich in an exhibition open 18 September 2015 — 26 June 2016

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“Moon and Antelao” by Marcella Giulia Pace

14 September 2015 Astronomy Now

Our final nomination from the prestigious Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition, an annual celebration of the most beautiful and spectacular visions of the cosmos by astrophotographers worldwide. The 2015 competition received 2700 spectacular entries from over 60 countries and the winners will be announced 17 September.